Content page

For the first time in Egypt,in collaboration between cardiothoracic surgery department and the egyptian scientific society of bronchology,workshop for cadaveric lung transplant with attendance of prof. Khaled Kattan from king Faisal specialized hospital in Riyadh

Postinfarction ventricular septal defect (PIVSD) is a devastating mechanical complication following acute myocardial infarction. The management of this pathology is quite challenging, especially in case of complicated cardiogenic shock. The difficulties lie in the timing and type of intervention. Debates exist with regard to immediate versus deferring repair, as well as open repair versus percutaneous closure. The anatomic characteristics and hemodynamic consequence of PIVSD are important elements determining which strategy to adopt, since large septal defect (>15 mm) cannot be appropriately treated by percutaneous occluder devices limiting by their available size, while compromised hemodynamics usually require emergent repair or mechanical support “bridging to surgery”. Herein, we report our experience of successful management of a case of cardiogenic shock complicating large PIVSD (38 mm) by delayed surgical repair bridged with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) during 7 days. We emphasize the importance of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography as a decision-making tool.

Postinfarction ventricular septal defect (PIVSD) is a devastating mechanical complication following acute myocardial infarction. The management of this pathology is quite challenging, especially in case of complicated cardiogenic shock. The difficulties lie in the timing and type of intervention. Debates exist with regard to immediate versus deferring repair, as well as open repair versus percutaneous closure. The anatomic characteristics and hemodynamic consequence of PIVSD are important elements determining which strategy to adopt, since large septal defect (>15 mm) cannot be appropriately treated by percutaneous occluder devices limiting by their available size, while compromised hemodynamics usually require emergent repair or mechanical support “bridging to surgery”. Herein, we report our experience of successful management of a case of cardiogenic shock complicating large PIVSD (38 mm) by delayed surgical repair bridged with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) during 7 days. We emphasize the importance of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography as a decision-making tool.

Postinfarction ventricular septal defect (PIVSD) is a devastating mechanical complication following acute myocardial infarction. The management of this pathology is quite challenging, especially in case of complicated cardiogenic shock. The difficulties lie in the timing and type of intervention. Debates exist with regard to immediate versus deferring repair, as well as open repair versus percutaneous closure. The anatomic characteristics and hemodynamic consequence of PIVSD are important elements determining which strategy to adopt, since large septal defect (>15 mm) cannot be appropriately treated by percutaneous occluder devices limiting by their available size, while compromised hemodynamics usually require emergent repair or mechanical support “bridging to surgery”. Herein, we report our experience of successful management of a case of cardiogenic shock complicating large PIVSD (38 mm) by delayed surgical repair bridged with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) during 7 days. We emphasize the importance of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography as a decision-making tool.

Postinfarction ventricular septal defect (PIVSD) is a devastating mechanical complication following acute myocardial infarction. The management of this pathology is quite challenging, especially in case of complicated cardiogenic shock. The difficulties lie in the timing and type of intervention. Debates exist with regard to immediate versus deferring repair, as well as open repair versus percutaneous closure. The anatomic characteristics and hemodynamic consequence of PIVSD are important elements determining which strategy to adopt, since large septal defect (>15 mm) cannot be appropriately treated by percutaneous occluder devices limiting by their available size, while compromised hemodynamics usually require emergent repair or mechanical support “bridging to surgery”. Herein, we report our experience of successful management of a case of cardiogenic shock complicating large PIVSD (38 mm) by delayed surgical repair bridged with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) during 7 days. We emphasize the importance of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography as a decision-making tool.

Giant-cell myocarditis (GCM) is known as a rare, rapidly progressive, and frequently fatal myocardial disease in young and middle-aged adults. We report about a 76?year old male patient who underwent implantation with a biventricular Berlin Heart Excor system at the age of 74 due to acute biventricular heart failure caused by giant-cell myocarditis. The implantation was without any surgical problems; however, a difficulty was the immunosuppressive therapy after implantation. Meanwhile the patient is 76?years old and lives with circulatory support for about 3?years without major adverse events. Also, in terms of mobility in old age there are no major limitations. It seems that in even selected elderly patients an implantation of a long term support with the biventricular Berlin Heart Excor is a useful therapeutic option with an acceptable outcome.

BackgroundPapillary muscle rupture (PMR) is a rare, but dramatic mechanical complication of myocardial infarction (MI), which can lead to rapid clinical deterioration and death. Immediate surgical intervention is considered the optimal and most rational treatment, despite high risks. In this study we sought to identify overall long-term survival and its predictors for patients who underwent mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR.MethodsFifty consecutive patients (mean age 64.7???10.8?years) underwent mitral valve repair (n?=?10) or replacement (n?=?40) for post-MI PMR from January 1990 through May 2014. Clinical data, echocardiographic data, catheterization data, and surgical data were stored in a dedicated database. Follow-up was obtained in June of 2014; mean follow-up was 7.1???6.8?years (range 0.0-22.2?years). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of long-term survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were compared with the log-rank test.ResultsKaplan-Meier cumulative survival at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20?years was 71.9???6.4%, 65.1???6.9%, 49.5???7.6%, 36.1???8.0% and 23.7???9.2%, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed logistic EuroSCORE ?40% and EuroSCORE II ?25% as strong independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival. After removal of the EuroSCOREs from the model, preoperative inotropic drug support and mitral valve replacement (MVR) without (partial or complete) preservation of the subvalvular apparatus were independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival.ConclusionsLogistic EuroSCORE ?40%, EuroSCORE II ?25%, preoperative inotropic drug support and MVR without (partial or complete) preservation of the subvalvular apparatus are strong independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR. Whenever possible, the subvalvular apparatus should be preserved in these patients.

BackgroundPapillary muscle rupture (PMR) is a rare, but dramatic mechanical complication of myocardial infarction (MI), which can lead to rapid clinical deterioration and death. Immediate surgical intervention is considered the optimal and most rational treatment, despite high risks. In this study we sought to identify overall long-term survival and its predictors for patients who underwent mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR.MethodsFifty consecutive patients (mean age 64.7???10.8?years) underwent mitral valve repair (n?=?10) or replacement (n?=?40) for post-MI PMR from January 1990 through May 2014. Clinical data, echocardiographic data, catheterization data, and surgical data were stored in a dedicated database. Follow-up was obtained in June of 2014; mean follow-up was 7.1???6.8?years (range 0.0-22.2?years). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of long-term survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were compared with the log-rank test.ResultsKaplan-Meier cumulative survival at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20?years was 71.9???6.4%, 65.1???6.9%, 49.5???7.6%, 36.1???8.0% and 23.7???9.2%, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed logistic EuroSCORE ?40% and EuroSCORE II ?25% as strong independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival. After removal of the EuroSCOREs from the model, preoperative inotropic drug support and mitral valve replacement (MVR) without (partial or complete) preservation of the subvalvular apparatus were independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival.ConclusionsLogistic EuroSCORE ?40%, EuroSCORE II ?25%, preoperative inotropic drug support and MVR without (partial or complete) preservation of the subvalvular apparatus are strong independent predictors of a lower overall long-term survival in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery for post-MI PMR. Whenever possible, the subvalvular apparatus should be preserved in these patients.

Complex pathology of the aorta, especially in patients presenting an aneurysm involving the entire aortic arch and proximal descending aorta has been approached in one or two stages. Surgical management of those with an extremely wide diameter of the proximal descending aorta is not yet well defined. The patient in this case was an asymptomatic 47-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) associated with aneurysm of the ascending aorta, whose aortic arch and descending aorta had presented only overall weakness (examination by inspection and palpation without histological verification). The imaging identified a giant aorta arising at the level of the sinotubular junction (STJ), ending up immediately below the diaphragm. In the first stage she underwent surgical replacement of the entire ascending aorta, aortic arch and proximal part of the descending aorta by combining the elephant trunk with a new type of aortoplasty. In the second stage an endovascular stent graft was inserted into the elephant trunk in the descending aorta. The patient continues to do well 20?months following the repair. In this manuscript type we describe a novel technique of ?V? aortoplasty of the proximal descending aorta in order to facilitate the performing of anastomosis between the Dacron graft and aortic aneurysm.

Several studies have demonstrated that local ischemic preconditioning can reduce myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury in cardiac surgery patients; however, preconditioning has not become a standard cardioprotective intervention, primarily because of the increased risk of atheroembolism during repetitive aortic cross-clamping. In the present study, we aimed to describe and validate a novel technique of preconditioning induction.

Treatment of damaged cardiac tissue in patients with high bleeding tendency can be very challenging, damaged myocardial tissue has a high rupture risk when being sutured subsequently on-going bleeding is a major risk factor for poor clinical outcome. We present a case demonstrating the feasibility in using a novel haemostatic collagen sponge for the management of a myocardial wound. This report is the first description in cardiac surgery where Hemopatch® sponges are used to successfully seal a left ventricle wound. Our patient was diagnosed with endocarditis, had a low pre-operative haemoglobin count and underwent cardiac surgery for multiple valve repairs. The procedure was performed on cardiopulmonary bypass, which meant our patient had to be heparinized. Despite these major risk factors for bleeding Hemopatch® managed to contain bleeding and seal the wound, no sutures were needed.

Contact with us